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Early Orioles great Gus Triandos dies at 82

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Luke Jones
Luke Jones
Luke Jones is the Ravens and Orioles beat reporter for WNST BaltimorePositive.com and is a PFWA member. His mind is consumed with useless sports knowledge, pro wrestler promos, and movie quotes, but he struggles to remember where he put his phone. Luke's favorite sports memories include being one of the thousands of kids who waited to get Cal Ripken's autograph after Orioles games in the summer of 1995, attending the Super Bowl XXXV victory parade with his father in the pouring rain, and watching the Terps advance to the Final Four at the Carrier Dome in 2002. Follow him on Twitter @BaltimoreLuke or email him at Luke@wnst.net.

One of the first great players in Orioles history to help usher in a new era of baseball in Baltimore in the 1950s, Gus Triandos has passed away at age 82.

According to The Sun, the four-time All-Star catcher died in his sleep and had dealt with congestive heart failure for the last 10 years. Triandos played with five teams in his 13-year major league career but gained fame handling the Baltimore pitching staff in the late 1950s.

In his eight seasons with the Orioles, Triandos clubbed 142 home runs and was behind the plate in 1958 when pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm threw the first no-hitter in club history. He began his career with the New York Yankees but came to Baltimore in 1955 as part of a lucrative 16-player deal between the clubs.

All four of Triandos’ All-Star appearances came during his time with the Orioles and his 30 home runs in 1958, tying Hall of Fame backstop Yogi Berra’s American League record for home runs by a catcher.

So popular in Baltimore, a street in Timonium was renamed Triandos Drive when he moved his family into the neighborhood.  The Orioles traded the slugging catcher to the Detroit Tigers following the 1962 season.

Triandos was inducted into the Orioles Hall of Fame in 1981 and is regarded by many as the best catcher in franchise history.

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