Friday, January 15, 2021

INTELLIGENT CONVERSATION

Cold, hard numbers prevail over emotion with Markakis’ departure

AUDIO VAULT

Luke Jones and Nestor psychoanalyze Ravens dancing on Titans logo and Lamar walking off postgame

Luke Jones and Nestor psychoanalyze Ravens dancing on Titans logo and Lamar walking off postgame

Todd Schuler and Nestor discuss a Ravens playoff win and the future of democracy in America

Todd Schuler and Nestor discuss a Ravens playoff win and the future of democracy in America

Luke Jones and Nestor give Lamar all praise after first playoff win

Luke Jones and Nestor give Lamar all praise after first playoff win

Luke Jones and Nestor recap an impressive road playoff win for Ravens in Tennessee

Luke Jones and Nestor recap an impressive road playoff win for Ravens in Tennessee

That time Tommy Lasorda dropped by for some steroids talk in baseball

We lost the legendary Tommy Lasorda on Friday. Back in 2002, the Dodgers Hall of Famer joined Nestor to talk about the changing state of baseball after chicks dug the long ball and the sports was drowning in PEDs.
Luke Jones
Luke Jones
Luke Jones is the Ravens and Orioles beat reporter for WNST BaltimorePositive.com and is a PFWA member. His mind is consumed with useless sports knowledge, pro wrestler promos, and movie quotes, but he struggles to remember where he put his phone. Luke's favorite sports memories include being one of the thousands of kids who waited to get Cal Ripken's autograph after Orioles games in the summer of 1995, attending the Super Bowl XXXV victory parade with his father in the pouring rain, and watching the Terps advance to the Final Four at the Carrier Dome in 2002. Follow him on Twitter @BaltimoreLuke or email him at Luke@wnst.net.

The Orioles faced difficult free-agent decisions entering the offseason after winning their first American League East title in 17 years.

The anticipated departures of slugger Nelson Cruz and shutdown lefty reliever Andrew Miller certainly hurt from an on-field standpoint, but both were hired guns for the 2014 season with little emotional attachment.

But longtime right fielder Nick Markakis?

That one hurts. It hurts a lot.

It stings fans, teammates who adore him and respect his everyday approach, and manager Buck Showalter, who has often said Markakis is the kind of player whose value isn’t fully felt until you don’t have him anymore.

That sentiment now becomes reality, and we’ll learn how true the manager’s words ring.

The organization’s longest-tenured player departing to sign a four-year, $44 million deal with the Atlanta Braves on Wednesday hurts as much as any Oriole to leave via free agency since longtime ace Mike Mussina joined the New York Yankees 14 years ago. After making his home in Monkton, Markakis was supposed to spend his entire career with the Orioles.

One of the lasting images of a wonderful 2014 season was watching Markakis, after enduring years of losing in Baltimore, celebrate the Orioles’ first division title since 1997 when they clinched in mid-September. After he could only watch the Orioles in the 2012 playoffs because of a season-ending thumb injury sustained a month earlier, the 2003 first-round pick finally earned his first taste of postseason play in his ninth major league season.

So, how did it get to this point after nearly everyone assumed that Markakis would be back?

Both local and national outlets reported a month ago that the Orioles and Markakis were working toward a four-year deal in the neighborhood of what the Braves ultimately paid the veteran outfielder. Concerns over a herniated disc in his neck discovered in 2013 reportedly prompted the Orioles to hedge on a guaranteed fourth year as the weeks progressed while Atlanta offered no such trepidation in bringing Markakis back to his home state.

Frustrated fans will understandably question the Orioles’ loyalty in how they negotiated and in ultimately failing to retain their longest-tenured player, but how much responsibility should Markakis hold? If he were truly committed to staying, why not sign a month ago when a similar offer was allegedly on the table instead of holding out for more and giving the Orioles the opportunity to rethink their position?

For as much as Markakis has been valued for his durability and consistency throughout his tenure in Baltimore, let’s not pretend the $30 million he earned in his final two seasons with the Orioles was reciprocated with similar value in production.

And that’s when we begin to view Markakis as the fascinating case study of weighing the old-school “gamer” against the cold, hard numbers he produces.

A look at the negative reaction from players via social media in the hours after the announcement suggests how unpopular the move will be in the Orioles clubhouse. Though a quiet man who doesn’t draw attention to himself, Markakis was a prime example of the club’s sum being better than its parts over the last three winning years. He plays the game the right way and is admired by teammates and fans alike.

But how much can and should you pay for those intangibles?

Assessing his value based solely on what shows up in the box score, Markakis likely isn’t worth close to $44 million over the next four seasons. In fact, observers with no apparent agenda are already saying the Braves will wildly regret investing so much in an outfielder whose numbers have declined over the last couple years.

Though he never developed the home run power some projected him to earlier in his career, Markakis averaged more than 65 extra-base hits per year from 2007 through 2010. He’s averaged just under 42 in each of the four years since, with only 34 in 160 games in 2013. What was once a gap hitter who regularly hit more than 40 doubles per year has become much more of a singles hitter — with little speed — in recent years.

His slugging percentage has dipped below .400 in each of the last two seasons, and he has only posted an on-base plus slugging percentage above .756 once in the last four years — his injury-abbreviated 2012 campaign when he produced an .834 OPS in only 471 plate appearances. Though a very good and dependable right fielder with a strong arm that resulted in him winning his second Gold Glove in 2014, Markakis’ range in right field has declined and figures to get worse over the next four years.

Those numbers aren’t presented to suggest Markakis no longer has any value as his durability, leadership, and work ethic can’t easily be quantified and will certainly be missed in addition to what he can still bring with the bat. But the numbers do confirm there is strong evidence to suggest he’s not worthy of a four-year investment after already showing substantial decline in recent seasons.

Only time will tell if the Orioles regret their decision based on how effectively they’re able to replace their longtime right fielder and on how he plays in his new home. It’s quite possible executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette made the responsible call, but that will only matter if the Orioles find a quality replacement at the top of the order and in right field to continue the momentum of three straight winning seasons and a 2014 division title.

That will be easier said than done based on what options are available on the open market unless they plan to overpay some other player after drawing a line in the sand with the longest-tenured member of the organization.

The numbers and projections certainly shouldn’t be ignored, but baseball isn’t played in a vacuum, either. Markakis will be missed by teammates and fans alike, but the cold, hard numbers ultimately prevailed.

Markakis wasn’t the biggest or only reason why the Orioles have won over the last three years, but he has been a significant part of what they’ve done. He’s been one of their rare hitters to work counts and get on base — major weaknesses for the club despite their winning record — and one of their most influential presences in a clubhouse that’s been harmonious under Showalter.

Despite the disappointment and the frustration felt by many over the lifelong Oriole’s departure and the questions it creates, four months remain before Opening Day. Duquette deserves some benefit of the doubt after a very rocky start to the offseason in which two key everyday players have bolted.

But the Orioles have a lot of work to do to appease both a shaken fan base and an unhappy clubhouse.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Thank God the Braves took this OVER-RATED player off the team !!! It just shows that Markakis is a money grabbing & selfish person, just like a lot of other players, go for the money. Enough with the great clubhouse guy talk, it’s a business,get over it. The O’s did the right thing in letting him go, where was Markakis’s loyalty to the club after being over paid for years by them, it’s a two way street. The money he was paid & what the O’s got in return was not equal. The Braves will end up being sorry they signed him for 4 years, wait & see !!!

  2. Markakis’ numbers since 2010 really aren’t very good. This is a tale of two players,
    a borderline great player from 2005-2010 (6 years, one of which was in the minors)
    a borderline decent player from 2011-2014 (4 years)

    Say what you will, but averaging 59.6 RBIs over the last 5 years is very mediocre.

    He would be a statistical outlier if he were to magically reverse this trend, nearly every player suffers a gradual decline, and 44 million for sunset years is hardly a good use of money.
    Well done Duquette.
    Cruz, an entirely different story. It’s going to be near impossible to get Cruz like production for anything close to what we could have re-signed him for. A major disappointment.

Comments are closed.

Latest News

Six former Baltimore County Executives discuss siege on Capitol and future of America

Ted Venetoulis. Don Hutchinson. Dennis Rasmussen. Jim Smith. Don Mohler. All led by Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger on Capitol Hill with a frank and open conversation about the future of America after a White Nationalist assault on democracy. Leadership matters.

More Articles Like This