What to expect from each of Ravens' 2016 draft picks

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The picks are in for the 2016 draft, so what should we expect from each of the Ravens’ 11 selections?
Below is an early look at how each rookie fits this coming season and in the future:
OT Ronnie Stanley
Drafted: First round (sixth overall) from Notre Dame
2016 projected role: The Ravens have sent plenty of mixed signals regarding the future of Eugene Monroe over the last several months, but Stanley will start at either left tackle or left guard.
Long-term view: It’s conceivable that the Ravens keep Monroe around for one more season, but the fact that they drafted two offensive tackles makes you think they’re in position to cut him and save $6.5 million in base salary for 2016. The expectation is that Stanley can be their left tackle for the next decade.
OLB Kamalei Correa
Drafted: Second round (42nd overall) from Boise State
2016 projected role: With Terrell Suggs, Elvis Dumervil, and Za’Darius Smith all ahead of him on the depth chart, Correa will likely serve as a situational edge rusher and special-teams contributor.
Long-term view: The 245-pound edge defender will need to get stronger for an every-down role and to consistently wreak havoc in the pocket, but he will use his speed to try to blow by slower linemen. The Ravens wouldn’t have used a second-round if they didn’t think he can be an eventual successor to Suggs.
DE Bronson Kaufusi
Drafted: Third round (70th overall) from Brigham Young
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-6, 285-pound defensive end figures to be a part of the rotation at the 5-technique spot and will likely compete with Lawrence Guy and Brent Urban for the starting job.
Long-term view: An opposing coach labeled Kaufusi a “modern-day Goliath” last year and the Ravens hope he can be a starter and an interior rusher in passing situations. Ozzie Newsome passed on the chance to draft DeForest Buckner in the first round, so Kaufusi’s development will be worth watching.
CB Tavon Young
Drafted: Fourth round (104th overall) from Temple
2016 projected role: After impressing the Ravens at the Senior Bowl, Young enters the mix with a chance to compete with veteran Kyle Arrington at the nickel spot and to contribute on special teams.
Long-term view: Young was a feisty competitor in college who started games in all four of his years with the Owls, but the 5-foot-9, 185-pound defensive back doesn’t project to be much more than a slot corner. The Ravens hope he shows more than recent mid-round picks such as Asa Jackson and Chykie Brown.
WR Chris Moore
Drafted: Fourth round (107th overall) from Cincinnati
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-1 wideout will compete for playing time in four-wide sets, but he is more likely to contribute on special teams if he’s to be active on Sundays as a rookie.
Long-term view: With Steve Smith and Mike Wallace potentially only in Baltimore for the coming season and Kamar Aiken set to become a free agent after 2016, Moore provides another deep-ball option to go with 2015 first-round pick Breshad Perriman. In a perfect world, both Perriman and Moore take major steps in 2016 and the Ravens re-sign Aiken as the possession receiver for 2017 and beyond.
OT Alex Lewis
Drafted: Fourth round (130th overall) from Nebraska
2016 projected role: His role will largely depend on what happens with Monroe and Stanley, but Lewis should have every chance to unseat third-year lineman James Hurst as the top reserve tackle.
Long-term view: With Monroe on his way out sooner or later and right tackle Rick Wagner scheduled to hit the free-agent market after 2016, Lewis could find himself competing for a starting role next year. Despite questions about his quickness, he has a shot to be a starting right tackle or a starting guard.
DT Willie Henry
Drafted: Fourth round (132nd overall) from Michigan
2016 projected role: It won’t be easy for Henry to crack the defensive line rotation, but his explosiveness and ability as a rusher could put him in the mix as an interior lineman in passing situations.
Long-term view: Henry brings versatility to the defensive line, but he didn’t show great awareness and consistency as a run defender at Michigan, making you wonder if he’s suited to be more of a third-down player. If Brandon Williams departs as a free agent after 2016, Henry could quickly see a larger role.
RB Kenneth Dixon
Drafted: Fourth round (134th overall) from Louisiana Tech
2016 projected role: His dynamic ability as a receiver out of the backfield will quickly put him in the offensive mix as a rookie, and he could challenge for the starting role sooner rather than later.
Long-term view: Dixon has the track record and skill set to rise above the other Baltimore running backs who may all be best suited to be No. 2 options. However, the 5-10, 215-pound back carried the ball 801 times in his college career, making you wonder if that could limit his shelf life at the NFL level.
OLB Matt Judon
Drafted: Fifth round (146th overall) from Grand Valley State
2016 projected role: Making the adjustment from the Division II level won’t be easy, but Judon could eventually work his way into a situational pass rusher role and contribute on special teams as a rookie.
Long-term view: The Ravens loved how he tested at the scouting combine and hope he will be the next Division II product to excel for them, but there will be a learning curve to develop more sophisticated pass-rush moves against better competition. This pick has plenty of upside, but patience will be the key.
WR Keenan Reynolds
Drafted: Sixth round (182nd overall) from Navy
2016 projected role: The record-setting Midshipmen quarterback will practice as a receiver, but his best chance of making the roster and contributing as a rookie will probably come as a return specialist.
Long-term view: The Ravens hope his athleticism can translate to the receiver position with visions of him working effectively out of the slot and being able to run a variety of plays. His 5-foot-10, 190-pound frame isn’t ideal for the NFL, but other college quarterbacks of similar build such as Antwaan Randle El and Julian Edelman made quick transitions to the NFL and you shouldn’t doubt Reynolds’ work ethic.

CB Maurice Canady
Drafted: Sixth round (209th overall) from Virginia
2016 projected role: The 6-foot-1, 195-pound defensive back had a disappointing senior season at Virginia, but he will have a chance to compete for a roster spot in a light group of cornerbacks.
Long-term view: Canady struggled to defend the deep ball and will need to play with more confidence than he did toward the end of his collegiate career. His best bet to stick with the Ravens and eventually develop into a contributor might come as a member of the practice squad.