Saturday, March 6, 2021

INTELLIGENT CONVERSATION

Chapter 3: My Pop and Little League in Dundalk

AUDIO VAULT

Luke Jones and Nestor discuss coaching staff changes for Harbaugh and Ravens

Luke Jones and Nestor discuss coaching staff changes for Harbaugh and Ravens

Teddy Savage of Planet Fitness discusses posture and movement as pandemic rolls into 2nd year

Our international (but made in Baltimore) fitness guru Teddy Savage of Planet Fitness discusses posture and movement as the pandemic continues and we all work from home on a screen.

Marty Conway and Nestor discuss future of Orioles and stadium situation

Marty Conway and Nestor discuss future of Orioles and stadium situation

Terps color analyst Chris Knoche joins Nestor to discuss big time college hoops realities during pandemic

Terps color analyst Chris Knoche joins Nestor to discuss big time college hoops realities during pandemic

Luke Jones and Nestor discuss magic of Orioles baseball for next 24 months in Baltimore

Luke Jones and Nestor discuss magic of Orioles baseball for next 24 months in Baltimore

(Originally published as a prelude to the “Free The Birds” walkout in Sept. 2006, this is Part 3 of a 19 Chapter Series on How baseball and the Orioles berthed WNST.net. If you’re as upset about the demise of the Baltimore Orioles, please save Thursday, April 5th for some civic action.)

I think the biggest part of my Pop’s revitalization as a person in the 1970’s after his son’s death wasn’t that he found a little sports buddy in me — as a bat boy and an avid baseball, football and basketball watcher — but in the abundance of energy it must’ve taken to keep up with me.

Can you imagine the energy it took a 60-year old, overweight steelworker after a full 90-degree, eight-hour day at Sparrows Point to chase a rambunctious 10-year old boy down from Section 34 in the summer of 1979? That happened every single night! Forty-two games that summer, I swear to God!

My Dad took great pride in volunteering as a Little League coach in my neighborhood, Colgate, near Eastpoint Mall. He won two league championships as the coach of the Colgate-Eastpoint Pirates in 1973 and 1974. It was a four-team league with a great parade through the neighborhood on Opening Day Saturday. It was very a very typical American kinda thing, I thought. I was the team batboy. We had our championship picture and clipping from The Dundalk Eagle on the kitchen wall from the day it was published through my father’s death in 1992. He loved coaching those kids and winning! I liked just being the batboy and being a part of baseball.

All of those “older” kids kind of took me under their wing and made me feel good. They played catch with me, pitched to me — stuff like that. And when you’re 4 or 5, that’s a pretty big deal! These kids were like 12 and 13 years old.

My Pop was such a little league wacko that one time he had a really talented kid named Ted Boccia, who wanted to be a catcher. Only problem was, he was LEFTHANDED!

He was adamant about catching and catching was my Pop’s FAVORITE position, the one he played as a kid. So, clearly being unable to find a left-handed catcher’s mitt anywhere in the known universe in 1973, he wrote to the Rawlings factory, told the story of this boy’s dream to be a left-handed catcher and they had one made and sent it to my Pop. I even think my Pop might’ve paid for it himself. Needless to say, the Eastpoint Pirates had an outstanding left-handed catcher, the only one I’ve ever seen in my life!

As for me during those years, I excelled at the greatest game ever played: waffle ball!

We played in my backyard and alley. All the neighborhood kids did.

There were no “fantasy” leagues or video games. There was APBA and Strat-o-Matic (we honestly didn’t discover those until adolescence and I loved me some “Strat” in the days when I got a little older), but we opted for good old-fashioned “put the bat through the glove” kinda ball.
ANY kind of ball, actually — wallball, wiffleball, kickball, rundown, pitcher’s handout or just plain, baseball — we’d play!

We’d play with pinkies (those soft spongy balls), we’d play with superballs, but mostly we’d play with tennis balls and wooden bats on the pavement at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church on the back side of Eastern Avenue. We’d play ANYTHING but softball,

2 COMMENTS

  1. Nestor, that brings back a lot of great memories. I was doing the exact same thing in my neighborhood. In the street was a homer, over the street was a grand slam. Thanks to the current Oriole regime, hardly any Baltimore kids will have the same memories.

  2. Nestor, how about stopping by the Dundalk Little Loop parade this year? I sent you an email. I also coach the Eastwood 7-8 basketball team, we’re in the final four.

Comments are closed.

Latest News

Defensive tackle Ellis, Ravens officially sign one-year contract

Justin Ellis appeared in 13 games in the 2020 regular season, making 17 tackles and starting three contests.

More Articles Like This